Posts Tagged ‘security’

JOHN 6:1-21

After this Jesus went to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, also called the Sea of Tiberias. A large crowd kept following him, because they saw the signs that he was doing for the sick. Jesus went up the mountain and sat down there with his disciples. Now the Passover, the festival of the Jews, was near. When he looked up and saw a large crowd coming toward him, Jesus said to Philip, “Where are we to buy bread for these people to eat?” He said this to test him, for he himself knew what he was going to do. Philip answered him, “Six months’ wages would not buy enough bread for each of them to get a little.”One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, said to him,“There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish. But what are they among so many people?” 10 Jesus said, “Make the people sit down.” Now there was a great deal of grass in the place; so they sat down, about five thousand in all. 11 Then Jesus took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated; so also the fish, as much as they wanted. 12 When they were satisfied, he told his disciples, “Gather up the fragments left over, so that nothing may be lost.” 13 So they gathered them up, and from the fragments of the five barley loaves, left by those who had eaten, they filled twelve baskets. 14 When the people saw the sign that he had done, they began to say, “This is indeed the prophet who is to come into the world.”

15 When Jesus realized that they were about to come and take him by force to make him king, he withdrew again to the mountain by himself.

16 When evening came, his disciples went down to the sea, 17 got into a boat, and started across the sea to Capernaum. It was now dark, and Jesus had not yet come to them. 18 The sea became rough because a strong wind was blowing. 19 When they had rowed about three or four miles, they saw Jesus walking on the sea and coming near the boat, and they were terrified. 20 But he said to them, “It is I; do not be afraid.”21 Then they wanted to take him into the boat, and immediately the boat reached the land toward which they were going.

We are told that this revelatory sign of feeding the multitude happened when “the Passover, the festival of the Jews, was near.” Put that together with the parallels between the First and New Testaments, of the provision of food in the wilderness (manna and quail/loaves and fish) and the deliverance through/over the water (Sea of Reeds/Sea of Galilee), and what you’ve got is a clear identification of Jesus as the New Moses. Jesus has come for our freedom, the writer is saying, and what we are set free from is ignorance, ego, and the fear of death. How these three conditions of our spiritual slavery fit and fuse together can be summarized as follows.

The price of self-consciousness (ego) is a gradual and somewhat anxious separation from the maternal reality. Through time we are gathering to ourselves greater degrees of control, autonomy, and individuality. These are not bad in themselves; in fact, they are necessary to the progress of our personal development as human beings. As the shadow side to all the gains and benefits of a healthy sense of self, however, we become increasingly aware of our vulnerability, our exposure to the erosions of mortality.

As our anxiety intensifies we try to compensate by attaching ourselves to whatever we hope will bring us security and happiness. It may be wealth and possessions, success and power, codependent relationships, or the afterlife rewards of religion. In the end we can no longer see through the knots and tangles of our attachments to the real truth of our existence.

Jesus came to emancipate us from this enslaved condition. By the path of love, we are enabled to rise into the light of truth and enjoy a life authentic and free. Love, Light, and Life: the three great themes of John’s Gospel.

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MATTHEW 4:1-11

Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. He fasted forty days and forty nights, and afterwards he was famished. The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written,

‘One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Then the devil took him to the holy city and placed him on the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down; for it is written,

‘He will command his angels concerning you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’”

Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor; and he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” 10 Jesus said to him, “Away with you, Satan! for it is written,

‘Worship the Lord your God,and serve only him.’”

11 Then the devil left him, and suddenly angels came and waited on him.

Using the imagery and terminology of Paul’s theory of Christ (Christology) we might define temptation as the down-pulling lure of our lower nature, as our preference for instant gratification over self-control, solid proof over the risk of faith, power and title over humble service. (Of course, we always have the option of saying, “The devil made me do it,” but that only amounts to a refusal of responsibility.)

In fact, these three types of temptation, represented by the words satisfaction, certainty, and superiority are the very ones that Jesus faced during his desert solitude.

The seduction of pleasure is the lure towards what feels good, what gratifies our impulses, satisfies our cravings, and scintillates the pleasure centers in our brains. Jesus was tempted to break his fast with a meal of warm bread, but he resisted for the sake of staying focused on his calling. He turned down the temptation of physical satisfaction and pleasure, which strengthened his resolve but also opened up a higher level of vulnerability.

Passing that test, he was next tempted to demand some sign of supernatural support that could anchor his security in a divine guarantee. We feel this within ourselves as a rising demand for some sign or miracle that will prove God’s presence and commitment to us. Our inner child wants desperately to know that some higher (taller) power is looking out for us.  Instead, Jesus turned it down, choosing to “live by faith, not by sight.”

Finally he was taken up to a mountain so high that he could see all the nations of the world. Here he was tempted to abort his mission as world liberator for the more attractive role of world conqueror. Once again, our lower self (ego) prefers recognition and glory to humble sacrifice. This is difference between the love of power and the power of love.

                                                                                            

A higher level of application in this story takes hold of Paul’s identification of Christ as our “new self” (see Ephesians 4:22-24), whose awakening requires that we surmount the conspiracy of lower needs, drives, and impulses for the sake of our maturity and spiritual fulfillment. Our path will take us from the “river baptism” of our conversion to God’s purpose for our life, through this “wilderness of temptation” where that purpose is tested and made strong, and finally into our “world mission” as liberators in our own right.

In reality, however, our journey will periodically (and unexpectedly, for that is the nature of temptation) double-back into the desert for clarification and realignment. The danger, and the reason why so many apparently “perfected” believers end up falling so hard, is that we might come to regard ourselves as deserving of pleasure, protected by angels, and confirmed in our success as better than others.

Jesus kept his focus. Neither the visceral urgency of hunger, his mental-emotional need for validation, nor the ego’s desire for supremacy and control were able to pull him from his chosen path. In the months and years ahead, he would have to occasionally withdraw into the mountains for meditation and renewal.

The devil would come around every so often, but because temptation equals opportunity plus inclination, genuine temptations became fewer and farther between.

PSALM 29

1 Ascribe to the Lord, O heavenly beings,
    ascribe to the Lord glory and strength.
2 Ascribe to the Lord the glory of his name;
    worship the Lord in holy splendor.

3 The voice of the Lord is over the waters;
    the God of glory thunders,
    the Lord, over mighty waters.
4 The voice of the Lord is powerful;
    the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.

5 The voice of the Lord breaks the cedars;
    the Lord breaks the cedars of Lebanon.
6 He makes Lebanon skip like a calf,
    and Sirion like a young wild ox.

7 The voice of the Lord flashes forth flames of fire.
8 The voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness;
    the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh.

9 The voice of the Lord causes the oaks to whirl,
    and strips the forest bare;
    and in his temple all say, “Glory!”

10 The Lord sits enthroned over the flood;
    the Lord sits enthroned as king forever.
11 May the Lord give strength to his people!
    May the Lord bless his people with peace!

In addition to the conventional tasks fulfilled by the gods and goddesses of the ancient world – managing the cosmos, blessing the fields, flocks, and women with fertility, giving victory in war and upholding the moral order – the God of Israel was rather unique for his attention to the forward progress of history.

This can partly be explained as reflecting the fact of Israel’s tribal and national experience, beginning as a nomadic people, having to contend with the near-constant threat of invasion once they settled Palestine, and undergoing the profound trauma of deportation and captivity in Babylon.

The current state of affairs for them as a nation was something that kept them looking to the horizon of the future for deliverance, security, or fulfillment. But beneath this psychological explanation lies a deeper spiritual one: the God of Israel was the transcendent anchor-point outside the turning cycles of time, who awakened and inspired in his people the self-understanding of being an instrument of a greater will and purpose.

That’s not to say that Israel couldn’t appreciate the mystery of being in the Now, or enjoy the passing beauty and pleasures of the moment. For them, however, the present moment was not defined so much by the revolutions of time past, as by the progressive realization of God’s promised future. Israel’s difference from other surrounding cultures is most pronounced in this idea of time as evolutionary and forward-moving.