Posts Tagged ‘Mark 10’

MARK 10:46-52

46 They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 48 Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 49 Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” 50 So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. 51 Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” 52 Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

Society saw no value in the likes of Bartimaeus, except perhaps as a convenient “drop box” for middle-class charity – providing the chance to pay off some of the guilty neglect and self-centered ambition with a few bucks. When he cried out for Jesus, the crowd was offended that he should want anything more than they had already been generous enough to give him (again, largely for themselves).

Beggars are not to have a voice; they are not to be noticed. Certainly it is unacceptable that they should become a nuisance. “Shut up, you damned rag!” they cursed. “Don’t you dare ask for more than you deserve!” But Bartimaeus persisted, even increasing his volume and pitch: “Jesus! Please have mercy on me!” And when Jesus called for him, the annoyed crowd said to the blind man in a scolding tone, “Lucky dog. Don’t blow this one.”

When Bartimaeus arrived at the place where Jesus was, he was confronted with a question that is critical to the advance of the spiritual life: “What do you want me to do for you?” The question of want (or longing, aspiration, or spiritual hunger) brings the matter of salvation to a profoundly personal focus.

The return path to the heart of God has been cleared of such impediments as penance payments or orthodox procedures, but progress down that path needs to be a voluntary effort – an ongoing act of decision and will – on the part of the one seeking salvation. Jesus’ question to Bartimaeus was his invitation to name precisely that for which he was yearning most deeply in his life. Once named, Bartimaeus’ own faith in its possibility became the effective agency for its realization.

Advertisements

MARK 10:46-52

46 They came to Jericho. As he and his disciples and a large crowd were leaving Jericho, Bartimaeus son of Timaeus, a blind beggar, was sitting by the roadside. 47 When he heard that it was Jesus of Nazareth, he began to shout out and say, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” 48 Many sternly ordered him to be quiet, but he cried out even more loudly, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” 49 Jesus stood still and said, “Call him here.” And they called the blind man, saying to him, “Take heart; get up, he is calling you.” 50 So throwing off his cloak, he sprang up and came to Jesus. 51 Then Jesus said to him, “What do you want me to do for you?” The blind man said to him, “My teacher, let me see again.” 52 Jesus said to him, “Go; your faith has made you well.” Immediately he regained his sight and followed him on the way.

As a humorous aside, “Bartimaeus son of Timaeus” was read by the author of Matthew, as he reviewed his sources (Mark’s Gospel being one of them), as indicating two individuals – Bartimaeus and the son of Timaeus – a confusion caused in part by the fact that the name Bar Timaeus in Aramaic translates as “son of Timaeus.” Not wanting to tamper with his source, Matthew simply copied the story into his own narrative, but with two blind beggars instead of one!

Here in the original story there is only one man, Bartimaeus, whose blindness is surely, on the level of symbolic meaning, representing our human condition generally: reaching out under the dark veil of spiritual ignorance for the Light and Love we need.

As a blind beggar, Bartimaeus was about as close as one could come to being a societal “bottom feeder.” Without social value or influence, his kind was forced to live off the scraps of charity the well-to-do might toss their way. As in our own day, back then the homeless and invalid beggars stationed themselves along the rush-hour thoroughfares and congested intersections of the middle-class rat race.

There were many like him who had no other recourse but to beg off the small change and stale bread of those who rushed by, their only ambition to get enough for now. Beyond that, however, they had little clarity or hope for more. But when Bartimaeus heard that Jesus the healer was coming by, his heart leapt within him. Here was his chance for what he had never dared imagine: to spring from his dark prison and see the light of the Day Star. “Jesus,” he cried out, “have mercy on me!”

MARK 10:35-45

35 James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” 36 And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” 37 And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” 38 But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” 39 They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; 40 but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

41 When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. 42 So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. 43 But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, 44 and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. 45 For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

The “cup” and the “baptism” that Jesus refers to  here are the ordeal and death that await him farther down the road. In fact, these metaphors were widely understood throughout the Greco-Roman world of Jesus’ day. We find them in the Greek tragedian Aeschylus, for example. The cup represents one’s destiny, in the mixture and amount of wine one has been given – by fate, according to Aeschylus; by God, according to Jesus.

And baptism, the ritual washing whereby one is submerged in the water in a symbolic death and “raised up” to newness of life, often stands for a particularly profound and severe crisis which deeply transforms and drastically rearranges one’s priorities and perspective in life. Jesus knew that full commitment to the call of God would eventually lead him into the desperate violence of others, of those especially who had vested interests in the present world-system of spiritual abuses and moral imbalances.

The Son of Man came to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many. A ransom is what is given up for the sake of securing the release or redemption of something (or someone) else. Jesus “gave up” his life not only on the cross, in his death, but throughout his ministry, as he “gave up” his time, energy, security, and comfort in the service of human hope and salvation. In doing this, he set free all those many who perceived in him the authentic life, who would find the faith and courage, then and now, to take up their cross and follow.

In truth, we are giving our lives up every day for something or other. The question we must ask ourselves is whether or not the object of our sacrifice is supremely wholesome and worthy.

MARK 10:35-45

35 James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came forward to him and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” 36 And he said to them, “What is it you want me to do for you?” 37 And they said to him, “Grant us to sit, one at your right hand and one at your left, in your glory.” 38 But Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?” 39 They replied, “We are able.” Then Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink; and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; 40 but to sit at my right hand or at my left is not mine to grant, but it is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

41 When the ten heard this, they began to be angry with James and John. 42 So Jesus called them and said to them, “You know that among the Gentiles those whom they recognize as their rulers lord it over them, and their great ones are tyrants over them. 43 But it is not so among you; but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant, 44 and whoever wishes to be first among you must be slave of all. 45 For the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.”

James and John were brothers by Zebedee, and are elsewhere named the “sons of thunder,” suggesting they were of the type that bring down storms. At least it is fair to say that these boys were not quiet and withdrawn; when the spirit moved them, they spoke up and acted out. Firebrands might be another name for such personalities. These are the movers and the shakers of the world, and no doubt the early Christian movement benefited from their aggressive involvement.

Another word that can apply to such extroverted and energetic individuals, however, is impulsive, which names their tendency to act on impulses coming up from the place in our human psychology below rational reflection or careful consideration. When James and John cornered Jesus for his promise of their superior positions in the coming kingdom, they were clearly not speaking out of a balanced and accurate understanding of his teaching.

It is as if, after Jesus has just revealed the Diamond Truth of his gospel, about the way of authentic life through the voluntary “death” of self-interest for the sake of another person’s wellbeing, these two then take Jesus aside and demand, “Uh-huh, but we’d like to be on top when everything shakes out.” If they had grasped his Truth they would have understood that as long as such ego concerns as status, power, recognition, and superiority are preoccupations, the call to go past the self in compassionate service, redemptive justice, and sacrificial love will not be heard.

MARK 10:2-16

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

10 Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. 11 He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; 12 and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

13 People were bringing little children to him in order that he might touch them; and the disciples spoke sternly to them. 14 But when Jesus saw this, he was indignant and said to them, “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs. 15 Truly I tell you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” 16 And he took them up in his arms, laid his hands on them, and blessed them.

Grasping, finally, the two-edged blade of this difficult passage, we need to ask the urgent question that rushes to the modern mind. Is Jesus here condemning every divorced and remarried person as an adulterer? And if so, then aren’t such people disqualified from grace and salvation because of the perpetual state of their sin?

Well, let’s say something first about grace and its disqualifications. According to Jesus there are none. Grace is not defined in terms of a recipient’s merit or obedient effort for its reward. Grace is God’s outpouring of life and blessing and love, regardless of whom it ‘spills’ on or how deserving they are. Grace is a “God thing.” Jesus invited tax collectors and prostitutes to his meals, not because he approved of their lifestyles or condoned their sin, but because he believed that everyone is sought and loved by God. He didn’t approve of adultery either, but he would not have excluded an adulterer from the fellowship.

But what about his hard words on divorce? To understand what Jesus meant when he called a remarried person an “adulterer,” we must try to appreciate his very high view of the marriage covenant. Marriage is a sacred union under God, the terms and conditions of which are not for the human partners to negotiate. In marrying, they are joining their lives together in a sacrament that constitutes them as a “new being” in the sight of God.

Just because, and for whatever legitimate reasons, the partners decide to divorce, doesn’t nullify the holy union – at least from God’s point of view. And Jesus was trying to help us see marriage, and all of our human relationships for that matter, from God’s point of view. The forgiveness of God, thankfully, means that we can always pick up the pieces of our lives and venture forth under God’s blessing, hopefully with a bit more wisdom under our hats.

MARK 10:2-16

Some Pharisees came, and to test him they asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife?” He answered them, “What did Moses command you?” They said, “Moses allowed a man to write a certificate of dismissal and to divorce her.” But Jesus said to them, “Because of your hardness of heart he wrote this commandment for you. But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh.’ So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

10 Then in the house the disciples asked him again about this matter. 11 He said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her; 12 and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”

13 People were bringing little children to him in order that he might touch them; and the disciples spoke sternly to them. 14 But when Jesus saw this, he was indignant and said to them, “Let the little children come to me; do not stop them; for it is to such as these that the kingdom of God belongs. 15 Truly I tell you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God as a little child will never enter it.” 16 And he took them up in his arms, laid his hands on them, and blessed them.

There are few places in the New Testament that stand to cause such a fuss in the Christian world as what we find in these remarks of Jesus regarding marriage and divorce. Before we take on the challenge of weighing his words, we should note the thing that links this passage to some other recent Dispatches.

A major idea that we have found has to do with what we might call the world’s habit of falling short of our human ideals. Job’s contemporaries (as well as our own) needed to believe that suffering was capable of being explained away using the model of justice: in short, you suffer what you deserve. And even though the psalmist believes this with all his heart, or at least wants to believe it, life itself will eventually relieve him of this mistaken (because naive) view.

The writer of Hebrews, for his part, admits to the discrepancy between our intended humanity and our present humanity, between our created glory and our fallen (or not-yet-risen, unawakened) condition. In the full and complicated picture, we have things as they appear in the center, with the way we wish things were on one side, and the way things really are on the other. Our task is to embrace and become what we truly are, though this requires that we release our anxious attachment to outgrown beliefs, with is no easy thing.

In this Gospel story, Jesus once again draws a line, this time between the conventional view of marriage in Jewish society and another, one might almost say idealistic, image of what marriage ought to be. Is this mere wishful thinking on Jesus’ part, or is there a deeper truth to be discovered in his challenge?