Posts Tagged ‘King David’

2 SAMUEL 18:5-9, 15, 31-33

The king ordered Joab and Abishai and Ittai, saying, “Deal gently for my sake with the young man Absalom.” And all the people heard when the king gave orders to all the commanders concerning Absalom.

So the army went out into the field against Israel; and the battle was fought in the forest of Ephraim. The men of Israel were defeated there by the servants of David, and the slaughter there was great on that day, twenty thousand men. The battle spread over the face of all the country; and the forest claimed more victims that day than the sword.

Absalom happened to meet the servants of David. Absalom was riding on his mule, and the mule went under the thick branches of a great oak. His head caught fast in the oak, and he was left hanging between heaven and earth, while the mule that was under him went on.

15 And ten young men, Joab’s armor-bearers, surrounded Absalom and struck him, and killed him.

31 Then the Cushite came; and the Cushite said, “Good tidings for my lord the king! For the Lord has vindicated you this day, delivering you from the power of all who rose up against you.” 32 The king said to the Cushite, “Is it well with the young man Absalom?” The Cushite answered, “May the enemies of my lord the king, and all who rise up to do you harm, be like that young man.”

33  The king was deeply moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept; and as he went, he said, “O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! Would I had died instead of you, O Absalom, my son, my son!”

Absalom was David’s third son by his wife Maacah, who was herself the daughter of a foreign king, Talmai of Geshur. Reputedly David’s favorite, Absalom had nonetheless conspired against his father for possession of the throne, managing to take control of the city of Hebron and setting his sights next on Jerusalem. For a while, David was on the run and hiding from Absalom’s rebel band, but then, after mustering his own army, he order the rebellion quashed.

“Deal gently for my sake with the young man Absalom,” David had instructed his commanders. But, in a fateful moment, Absalom’s hair got caught in the branches of a tree under which his mule was passing, and he hung there, the story tells us, “between heaven and earth.” And then, when the soldiers of David’s commander, Joab, happened upon the dangling traitor, they drew their swords and killed him on the spot.

David’s reaction to the news of Absalom’s murder is reminiscent of how he had handled the death of his enemy King Saul years before. His grief in both instances is testimony to his amazing ability to separate in his mind between the dignity of his human aggressors on the one hand and their malicious intentions on the other. Behind the mask of a terrorist and would-be assassin was the face of Absalom, his beloved son.

2 SAMUEL 11:1-15

In the spring of the year, the time when kings go out to battle, David sent Joab with his officers and all Israel with him; they ravaged the Ammonites, and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem.

It happened, late one afternoon, when David rose from his couch and was walking about on the roof of the king’s house, that he saw from the roof a woman bathing; the woman was very beautiful. David sent someone to inquire about the woman. It was reported, “This is Bathsheba daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite.” So David sent messengers to get her, and she came to him, and he lay with her. (Now she was purifying herself after her period.) Then she returned to her house. The woman conceived; and she sent and told David, “I am pregnant.”

So David sent word to Joab, “Send me Uriah the Hittite.” And Joab sent Uriah to David. When Uriah came to him, David asked how Joab and the people fared, and how the war was going. Then David said to Uriah, “Go down to your house, and wash your feet.” Uriah went out of the king’s house, and there followed him a present from the king. But Uriah slept at the entrance of the king’s house with all the servants of his lord, and did not go down to his house. 10 When they told David, “Uriah did not go down to his house,” David said to Uriah, “You have just come from a journey. Why did you not go down to your house?” 11 Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah remain in booths; and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are camping in the open field; shall I then go to my house, to eat and to drink, and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do such a thing.” 12 Then David said to Uriah, “Remain here today also, and tomorrow I will send you back.” So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day. On the next day,13 David invited him to eat and drink in his presence and made him drunk; and in the evening he went out to lie on his couch with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house.

14 In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab, and sent it by the hand of Uriah. 15 In the letter he wrote, “Set Uriah in the forefront of the hardest fighting, and then draw back from him, so that he may be struck down and die.”

In his book Awaken the Leader Within, Bill Perkins defines temptation as having the inclination to sin and the opportunity to sin – at the same time. Inclination refers to the inner urge, the tendency, the itch to do something we know isn’t right and good. Opportunity is what the environment brings around or opens up to us at a particular moment in time.

You may have the inclination toward sin – doing what alienates you from the constancy of God’s grace and from the higher reaches of well-being – but no opportunity. In that case, it will likely remain a mere fantasy. (This is not altogether innocent, as Jesus taught, for all kinds of trouble are born out of the runaway fantasies of the human heart.) If, on the other hand, the opportunity comes around but you have no desire for its realization, temptation will pass you by, probably unrecognized. But when the two coincide, watch out!

With her husband away in battle, the sight of the bathing Bathsheba from King David’s palace roof was only an opportunity for him. It was the subsequent arousal of his lust for her that made it into a temptation. Still, even at the precise moment, when the fantasies had begun forming in David’s mind, he could have listened to his conscience and closed the blinds. Instead, he followed the lure of impulse. After all, he was king!

2 SAMUEL 6:1-5, 12b-19

David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand.David and all the people with him set out and went from Baale-judah, to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who is enthroned on the cherubim. They carried the ark of God on a new cart, and brought it out of the house of Abinadab, which was on the hill. Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart with the ark of God; and Ahio went in front of the ark. David and all the house of Israel were dancing before the Lord with all their might, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals.

So David went and brought up the ark of God from the house of Obed-edom to the city of David with rejoicing; 13 and when those who bore the ark of the Lord had gone six paces, he sacrificed an ox and a fatling. 14 David danced before the Lord with all his might; David was girded with a linen ephod. 15 So David and all the house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouting, and with the sound of the trumpet.

16 As the ark of the Lord came into the city of David, Michal daughter of Saul looked out of the window, and saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord; and she despised him in her heart.

17 They brought in the ark of the Lord, and set it in its place, inside the tent that David had pitched for it; and David offered burnt offerings and offerings of well-being before the Lord. 18 When David had finished offering the burnt offerings and the offerings of well-being, he blessed the people in the name of the Lord of hosts, 19 and distributed food among all the people, the whole multitude of Israel, both men and women, to each a cake of bread, a portion of meat, and a cake of raisins. Then all the people went back to their homes.

In his excitement David danced before the Ark of the Covenant “with all his might,” the text tells us. We are reminded of what Jesus said in response to the question about which commandment is the greatest of all (Mark 12:28). He replied that the greatest commandment is “to love God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all you strength.” There is no place for complacency in the religious life, where the full investment of one’s energy, attention, and devotion is the key that unlocks the door to life’s deepest meaning. In the words of the nineteenth-century philosopher Ludwig Feuerbach: “Only was is an object of passion, really is.”

Such energetic demonstrations as David’s frequently invite the suspicion and disdain of what another nineteenth-century thinker called religion’s “cultured despisers.” They are the ones who, like David’s wife Michal, look with distaste upon the ecstasies of the spirit. Worship in their opinion is all about propriety, decorum, and structured liturgies. To dance is to be too much in the body, too wild and out of control. Surely God cannot be honored by such displays! But in fact, God is honored and blessed by acts of worship that engage the distinct yet interrelated dimensions of our total being. When the body is essentially uninvolved, our experience of God becomes disembodied and artificially sanitized. God is glorified in creation, and in our full praise as creatures.

2 SAMUEL 6:1-5, 12b-19

David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand.David and all the people with him set out and went from Baale-judah, to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who is enthroned on the cherubim. They carried the ark of God on a new cart, and brought it out of the house of Abinadab, which was on the hill. Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart with the ark of God; and Ahio went in front of the ark. David and all the house of Israel were dancing before the Lord with all their might, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals.

So David went and brought up the ark of God from the house of Obed-edom to the city of David with rejoicing; 13 and when those who bore the ark of the Lord had gone six paces, he sacrificed an ox and a fatling. 14 David danced before the Lord with all his might; David was girded with a linen ephod. 15 So David and all the house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouting, and with the sound of the trumpet.

16 As the ark of the Lord came into the city of David, Michal daughter of Saul looked out of the window, and saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord; and she despised him in her heart.

17 They brought in the ark of the Lord, and set it in its place, inside the tent that David had pitched for it; and David offered burnt offerings and offerings of well-being before the Lord. 18 When David had finished offering the burnt offerings and the offerings of well-being, he blessed the people in the name of the Lord of hosts, 19 and distributed food among all the people, the whole multitude of Israel, both men and women, to each a cake of bread, a portion of meat, and a cake of raisins. Then all the people went back to their homes.

The Ark of the Covenant was about as close as ancient Israel was allowed to come in representing the deity named Yahweh, who had revealed himself to Moses on Mount Sinai through the burning bush. Graven images of the god (idols, reliefs, portraits) were prohibited, and even mental images (or concepts) of Yahweh were rejected by the more puritanical critics as sacrilegious attempts to reduce the transcendent mystery and holy otherness of Yahweh to visible and inferior form. While the Ark did not itself represent Yahweh, it was believed that the god resided in the sacred space between the outstretched wings of two golden cherubim positioned on either side.

As we might expect, and knowing the tendencies of human nature, there were some who made the Ark itself into an idol. A story from earlier in 1 Samuel tells of a terrible defeat suffered by the army of Israel at the hands of the Philistines, having advanced to the battle line in the belief that victory was guaranteed so long as the gold-plated war box was out in front. For his part, however, David appears to have kept the Ark in perspective, celebrating its history and presence with his people, but acknowledging all the while that the reality of God is beyond every symbol. Valid symbols and healthy ceremony relate us to the Divine without making absolute claims for themselves.