Archive for the ‘Fifty-First Bundle’ Category

MARK 8:27-38

27 Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi; and on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” 28 And they answered him, “John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.” 29 He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Messiah.” 30 And he sternly ordered them not to tell anyone about him.

31 Then he began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. 32 He said all this quite openly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. 33 But turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.”

34 He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35 For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel,will save it. 36 For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? 37 Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? 38 Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”

After rebuking Peter for his adversarial role against the forward advance of the gospel mission, Jesus turned to the crowd and defined in the clearest terms possible what it means to be a Christian (literally a disciple or follower of Christ). Confirming the universal fact that what people everywhere want and are looking for is life in its fullness, Jesus also confirmed what is equally universal – our human tendency to grasp at things that have only the semblance of life, but which are paltry forgeries and hollow counterfeits of the Real Thing.

As we listen to Jesus, we are reminded of Wisdom’s invitation to authentic life in Proverbs 1. Beneath the crisscrossed surface of our wandering path through this world lies the developmental guiding line of the Human Ideal – the sequence of steps, stages, and seasons of life that define our evolutionary progress toward fulfillment, just as the growth phases of the oak tree unfold according to a design genetically encoded in the acorn.

We depart from this deeper path to our own frustration and possible peril. “If you seek to save your life” by clinging desperately to your attachments or running after the next promising thing, you are certain to lose the full meaning and joy of being alive.

The prescription for finding genuine life – abundant, real, authentic, eternal life – requires the self-surpassing act of “losing yourself” for the sake of what truly matters. For Jesus, the gospel of the kingdom of God and its way is the ultimate foundation of value, meaning, and human fulfillment. Now we can see that this gospel prescription is exactly the same thing that Wisdom also was inviting us to find. In fact, very early Christian traditions identified Jesus with divine Wisdom (cf 1 Corinthians 1:22-24).

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MARK 8:27-38

27 Jesus went on with his disciples to the villages of Caesarea Philippi; and on the way he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that I am?” 28 And they answered him, “John the Baptist; and others, Elijah; and still others, one of the prophets.” 29 He asked them, “But who do you say that I am?” Peter answered him, “You are the Messiah.” 30 And he sternly ordered them not to tell anyone about him.

31 Then he began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. 32 He said all this quite openly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. 33 But turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.”

34 He called the crowd with his disciples, and said to them, “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. 35 For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel,will save it. 36 For what will it profit them to gain the whole world and forfeit their life? 37 Indeed, what can they give in return for their life? 38 Those who are ashamed of me and of my words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of them the Son of Man will also be ashamed when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.”

Jesus was what we would confidently call an authentic person, someone who was deeply attuned to the Wisdom or essential purpose of his life. He never compromised his path for the sake of comfort or security, which is not to say that he didn’t wrestle against the will of God (another name for Wisdom) from time to time.

Neither did he play down to the expectations of others or allow them to qualify his passion for what was right and true and just. His love for the world came pure and strong out of a center of peace with God and compassion for the suffering other. So when he asked his disciples what judgments they were entertaining in their minds concerning his identity, Peter, profoundly grasped and moved by what he saw and felt in his master-teacher, confessed: “You are the Messiah!”

But then, after Jesus revealed to the group what fate was gathering for him down the road, Peter blurted out, “No way, Lord!” (Actually Mark’s Gospel only tells us that Peter “took him aside and began to rebuke him”; later writers couldn’t resist putting the words in his mouth.) What Jesus says next has exercised and troubled the Christian imagination for centuries, but it need not perplex us. What Jesus meant when he called Peter “satan” was simply that the disciple, who ought to have been following him, was presently standing in his way as an adversary to his true and higher purpose (satan literally means adversary).

JAMES 3:1-12

Not many of you should become teachers, my brothers and sisters, for you know that we who teach will be judged with greater strictness. For all of us make many mistakes. Anyone who makes no mistakes in speaking is perfect, able to keep the whole body in check with a bridle. If we put bits into the mouths of horses to make them obey us, we guide their whole bodies. Or look at ships: though they are so large that it takes strong winds to drive them, yet they are guided by a very small rudder wherever the will of the pilot directs. So also the tongue is a small member, yet it boasts of great exploits.

How great a forest is set ablaze by a small fire! And the tongue is a fire. The tongue is placed among our members as a world of iniquity; it stains the whole body, sets on fire the cycle of nature, and is itself set on fire by hell. For every species of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by the human species, but no one can tame the tongue—a restless evil, full of deadly poison. With it we bless the Lord and Father, and with it we curse those who are made in the likeness of God. 10 From the same mouth come blessing and cursing. My brothers and sisters, this ought not to be so. 11 Does a spring pour forth from the same opening both fresh and brackish water? 12 Can a fig tree, my brothers and sisters, yield olives, or a grapevine figs? No more can salt water yield fresh.

According to the Genesis myth of creation it was the word of God – “Let there be!” – that brought forth light, matter, and the myriad creatures. Rather than reading this story literally we can interpret it as “an ode to the word,” capturing in a narrative portrait the profound power in speech for bringing forth worlds – or destroying them, as the case may be.

As creaturely reflections of God, human beings have the creative capacity in language to call intelligent order from the sensory chaos of experience. And as the agency of communication, the word carries into audible and textual signs the otherwise hidden intentions of our minds and hearts.

Seeing as how much of human culture is really the technical transformation of material energy into structures of meaning, and how totally meaning is a product of language, and finally how much of language is about words and the relationships among words, we begin to appreciate the real insight in what may have seemed like exaggerated warnings in the Letter of James regarding the tongue and its power.

The greatest of human capacities – to create and live within word-worlds of meaning – can be turned in either a godly or demonic direction. It can name and tame the beasts of the wilds, and it can curse, malign, and condemn our human neighbor. We can stand up on Sundays to recite the prayers and historic creeds of the church, but once back home we can pick up again with the destructive family patterns of the things we say to one another as well as the things we tell ourselves.

There must have been a toxic dose of hypocrisy moving about the circulatory system of the early church!

JAMES 3:1-12

Not many of you should become teachers, my brothers and sisters, for you know that we who teach will be judged with greater strictness. For all of us make many mistakes. Anyone who makes no mistakes in speaking is perfect, able to keep the whole body in check with a bridle. If we put bits into the mouths of horses to make them obey us, we guide their whole bodies. Or look at ships: though they are so large that it takes strong winds to drive them, yet they are guided by a very small rudder wherever the will of the pilot directs. So also the tongue is a small member, yet it boasts of great exploits.

How great a forest is set ablaze by a small fire! And the tongue is a fire. The tongue is placed among our members as a world of iniquity; it stains the whole body, sets on fire the cycle of nature, and is itself set on fire by hell. For every species of beast and bird, of reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by the human species, but no one can tame the tongue—a restless evil, full of deadly poison. With it we bless the Lord and Father, and with it we curse those who are made in the likeness of God. 10 From the same mouth come blessing and cursing. My brothers and sisters, this ought not to be so. 11 Does a spring pour forth from the same opening both fresh and brackish water? 12 Can a fig tree, my brothers and sisters, yield olives, or a grapevine figs? No more can salt water yield fresh.

The science of cultural anthropology marks the arrival of our distinctive human consciousness with the emergence of language. As an evolutionary advance on the primitive signal systems of animal communication where the motivation is for behavioral responses of various sorts (e.g., territorial warnings, courtship rituals, dominance displays, social bonding), human language introduces a capacity for mentally representing the world in such a way that meaning becomes the overarching concern.

What is the meaning of property? What is the significance of love? Such questions reveal a mind that is no longer satisfied with mere animal preoccupations. For the first time consciousness becomes a creator, and constructing a world of meaning becomes its new and everlasting fascination.

Words, then, are not mere signals to elicit behavioral responses; they are building blocks in the cultural cosmos of human meaning. Not only that, words can also serve to break apart and bring to collapse the cultural assumptions and judgments that enforce a particular worldview over rival perspectives and belief systems. At the more personal level, we are each familiar with the power in words to build up or tear down the largely emotional architecture of human relations.

With a single word the confidence of a young toddler can be devastated for years. With mere words we can alternately inspire hope and break trust, praise and blame, forgive and condemn. And it’s all in the power of this little organ, the tongue, and how we control it.

PSALM 19

The heavens are telling the glory of God;
    and the firmament proclaims his handiwork.
Day to day pours forth speech,
    and night to night declares knowledge.
There is no speech, nor are there words;
    their voice is not heard;
yet their voice goes out through all the earth,
    and their words to the end of the world.

In the heavens he has set a tent for the sun,
which comes out like a bridegroom from his wedding canopy,
    and like a strong man runs its course with joy.
Its rising is from the end of the heavens,
    and its circuit to the end of them;
    and nothing is hid from its heat.

The law of the Lord is perfect,
    reviving the soul;
the decrees of the Lord are sure,
    making wise the simple;
the precepts of the Lord are right,
    rejoicing the heart;
the commandment of the Lord is clear,
    enlightening the eyes;
the fear of the Lord is pure,
    enduring forever;
the ordinances of the Lord are true
    and righteous altogether.
10 More to be desired are they than gold,
    even much fine gold;
sweeter also than honey,
    and drippings of the honeycomb.

11 Moreover by them is your servant warned;
    in keeping them there is great reward.
12 But who can detect their errors?
    Clear me from hidden faults.
13 Keep back your servant also from the insolent;
    do not let them have dominion over me.
Then I shall be blameless,
    and innocent of great transgression.

14 Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart
    be acceptable to you,
    Lord, my rock and my redeemer.

For the heavens to “tell” and the firmament to “proclaim” anything more than dumb material existence is an absurd notion to the modern mind. Receiving instruction, cooperatively or unconsciously, in the school of Western scientific materialism, our age has accepted a worldview that is essentially absent of spiritual or symbolic meaning. The universe – just is, that’s all. 

Modern religion may still hold a place for God as creator, sustainer, and final judge, but the heavens and the firmament for us are just so much limitless space and atmospheric gases. The day does not “pour forth speech” nor does the night “declare knowledge.” Space and time have become mere categories, containers for the amazing variety of still more meaningless stuff.

Now, that picture may sound bleak and grim, but the surprising thing to learn is that it isn’t peculiar to our own cultural period and worldview. “There is no speech, nor are there worlds; their voice is not heart” – such was the state of things in ancient Israel. It would seem that what we are complaining of here is a more universally human problem, and not just a modern one.

Perhaps it is more accurate to say that Western scientific materialism simply accepted the universe as consisting of dumb matter, never suspecting that the real problem was not in the world itself but in the spiritually deaf ear of the human observer. The psalmist asked God for an orientation course in spiritual attention and higher awareness – to open his ears.

PROVERBS 1:20-33

20 Wisdom cries out in the street;
    in the squares she raises her voice.
21 At the busiest corner she cries out;
    at the entrance of the city gates she speaks:
22 “How long, O simple ones, will you love being simple?
How long will scoffers delight in their scoffing
    and fools hate knowledge?
23 Give heed to my reproof;
I will pour out my thoughts to you;
    I will make my words known to you.
24 Because I have called and you refused,
    have stretched out my hand and no one heeded,
25 and because you have ignored all my counsel
    and would have none of my reproof,
26 I also will laugh at your calamity;
    I will mock when panic strikes you,
27 when panic strikes you like a storm,
    and your calamity comes like a whirlwind,
    when distress and anguish come upon you.
28 Then they will call upon me, but I will not answer;
    they will seek me diligently, but will not find me.
29 Because they hated knowledge
    and did not choose the fear of the Lord,
30 would have none of my counsel,
    and despised all my reproof,
31 therefore they shall eat the fruit of their way
    and be sated with their own devices.
32 For waywardness kills the simple,
    and the complacency of fools destroys them;
33 but those who listen to me will be secure
    and will live at ease, without dread of disaster.”

The Wisdom literature of the ancient Near East, some of which is represented in the biblical writings of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job, and the Psalms, envisions the living form of the human being as maturing along a path toward fulfillment. Imagining a straight line, we might thus represent the ideal trajectory of a human life as progressing from genesis to fulfillment, moving through predictable passages and developmental stages along the way.

In real life, each human being makes choices that take him or her in a winding fashion, at times crossing over but then diverging from this evolutionary life-line. Those points in experience when our path intersects or briefly merges with this ideal line are called “opportunities.” Listening to the voice of Wisdom can increase the frequency of our opportunities and deepen our fulfillment in life.

The voice of Lady Wisdom in the mythology of the Bible is portrayed as calling to the human being so as to choose and live according to the path of greatest happiness. Even though we may think at times that our happiness will be best served by way of this or that pleasure, achievement, or fortune, the truth is that we are happiest when we are following the guiding line of our Human Ideal. Wandering off course brings natural consequences, not punishment.