1 PETER 2:19-25

19 For it is a credit to you if, being aware of God, you endure pain while suffering unjustly.20 If you endure when you are beaten for doing wrong, what credit is that? But if you endure when you do right and suffer for it, you have God’s approval. 21 For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his steps.

22 “He committed no sin,
    and no deceit was found in his mouth.”

23 When he was abused, he did not return abuse; when he suffered, he did not threaten; but he entrusted himself to the one who judges justly. 24 He himself bore our sins in his body on the cross, so that, free from sins, we might live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed. 25 For you were going astray like sheep, but now you have returned to the shepherd and guardian of your souls.

The desire for approval coincides exactly with the ego’s most passionate pursuit: recognition. To be noticed, validated, accepted, affirmed, praised, rewarded, promoted and glorified – this is what we might call the ladder of upward mobility in ego ambition. Whether at the first rung of this ladder or the last, the primary reference of value is “me” – the self-involved ego.

The gospel of Jesus went to the key term in this motivational system, insisting that human liberation and the healing of our world are possible only as we are able to rise above and get beyond the neurotic contraction of “me” and “mine.” If he ever proclaimed a heavenly treasure for those who would give everything to the poor and follow him, it was only to get them invested in his kingdom movement. In addition to promoting restorative justice through the redistribution of wealth, their time together would give him opportunity to open their hearts and free them of the need for reward.

Jesus wasn’t on a sweeping campaign through the world, scooping up as many converts as he could on his way back to heaven. His kingdom movement was about waking people up, setting them free, and making them whole – NOW, not later on or somewhere else.

But sadly this is the direction Christianity went. As an institutional religion under the “Christian” banner, the irony is that the farther it went along, the more unlike Jesus it became. Condemning the world that Jesus loved and separating itself from the people that Jesus sought, the Church turned out to be his greatest adversary. Keeping pure by staying inside, pleasing God by being obedient, waiting for Jesus to come again: Only a few have seen through this trance as the Church’s business plan, not the original gospel of Jesus.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s